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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Renewables on the Rise 2018

Over the last decade, clean energy has grown by leaps and bounds. Technologies that can help America shift away from fossil fuels — like solar panels, wind turbines, LED light bulbs, energy storage and electric cars — have gone from novelties to core features of the nation's energy landscape.

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News Release | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Trouble in the Air: Phoenix’s health at risk with 110 dirty air days in 2016

As the Trump administration considers weakening federal air quality and global warming emissions standards, air pollution remains a threat to public health. According to a new report by Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center, 4.6 million people in the Phoenix metropolitan area experienced 110 days of degraded air quality in 2016, increasing the risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

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Report | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Trouble in the Air

People across America regularly breathe unhealthy air that increases their risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

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News Release | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Trump administration urged to abandon plans for uranium mining near the Grand Canyon

“We need a national monument to protect the Grand Canyon area and the Colorado River permanently,” said Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.), Ranking Member of the House Natural Resources Committee. “Until we get one, Americans across the country need to make sure the Trump administration doesn’t lift the 20-year moratorium on uranium mining in the region. New mining would be devastating to local communities and to the Grand Canyon itself. This report is a timely reminder of what’s at stake." 

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Report | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Grand Canyon at Risk

The drinking supply of nearly one-eighth of Americans is too vital a resource to risk in order to access uranium, especially at a time when renewable energy sources are proving increasingly capable of meeting our energy needs. To protect the Grand Canyon, its residents, the millions of people who visit each year and the millions of Americans who drink from the Colorado River, the surrounding lands should remain closed to new uranium mines.

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